5th Annual Healthy Schools Summit

Thursday, December 3, 2020 from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM EST

How are school stakeholders coming together to realize our shared goal for green, safe and healthy schools for students and staff to return to? How are school leaders translating public health research into action to prevent the spread of COVID-19? What resources are available for our educators, nurses, parents, and students to respond to existing and emerging school health needs? Join us as we tackle these issues head-on with national, state, and local experts in a virtual conference format at the 5th Annual Healthy Schools Summit! Continuing education credits available for educators and school health professionals pending approval.

Highlights Include:

  • Keynote addresses from Tracy Enger, Program Manager at the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, and Anisa Heming, Director, Center for Green Schools
  • Public Health Decision Making for School Leaders Panel Discussion
  • Clearing the Air: Indoor Air Quality and COVID-19 in Schools
  • Virtual Healthy Schools Recognition Program Awards Ceremony
  • Workshops for educators (focused on Public Health and Civics), school health professionals, and youth!

Learn more about the virtual event and how to register

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Related Posts

Back to School: Healthy School Supplies Guide

Opting for greener back to school supplies not only saves the environment and your health but can save money too. These tips can help you, as a parent, teacher, or student, choose non-toxic and eco-friendly school supplies for a healthier, safer school year.

What are Single-use plastics and why are they bad?

Recycling plastic materials is a good way to reduce the carbon footprint. However, over 90% of plastics are not being recycled and instead being thrown away and dumped into landfills or littered into the environment.

Forever Chemical (PFAS) Causes a Water Crisis

On July 16th, McKeesport, PA residents were advised to not use their tap water for any purpose following a fire in the community. It was believed that more than 500 homes could have water contaminated with PFAS, a toxic class of chemicals that had been released from a chemical-based firefighting foam, known officially as aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF).

National Healthy Homes Month

As we spend more time in our home’s we become more susceptible to potential harms like mold, lead exposure, radon, toxic products that we use for cleaning or personal care, as well as outdoor pollution.