The importance of Public Health.

“A-ha” moments usually come when you least expect them, even during the most ordinary experiences. Sophomore year of college I was sitting in my infectious disease class and I was introduced to a term that I had never heard about- public health. I realized that all the aspects that I enjoyed learning about in my course work- collaboration, engaging with individuals and communities directly, and most importantly prevention- were all central tenants of public health. What is public health you may ask?

“Public health promotes and protects the health of people and the communities where they live, learn, work and play.”

Public health is at the core of the work that we do here at Women for a Healthy Environment. We engage in interdisciplinary collaborations, work to prevent adverse health exposures, educate individuals and community members, and look holistically at systems when advocating for new policy changes.

This week we are excited to be celebrating National Public Health Week. Join us all week as we chat about the different ways Women for a Healthy Environment works to create healthier communities. Learn more about the importance of public health here. I hope this week allows you to learn how public health is all around us, and who knows- it may create some of your own “a-ha” moments!

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